white-anthurium

More than 800 species of anthurium are native to tropical regions in North America. They are also a popular indoor plant because they have large ornamental leaves and can produce flowers all year long.

These instructions will provide the information you need to keep your potted anthurium healthy indoors.

Light: While anthuriums are able to tolerate moderately low light, they grow best in bright, indirect light. Never place an anthurium in direct sunlight as this can cause the leaves to burn.

Water: Anthurium plants are sensitive to overwatering; for disease control, make sure there is never standing water. The soil should be slightly moist, but not too wet. Water your anthurium whenever the soil feels dry to the touch. When watering, be thorough and allow the soil to dry slightly before watering again.

If the plant gets too dry it may suffer root damage. Rehydrate the root ball by soaking the entire pot in water for about 20 minutes.

Soil: Use a course, free-draining soil. A 50-50 mix of potting soil and orchid soil can provide a good environment for proper hydration.

Temperature: These plants prefer moderate to warm temperatures, about 70-90°F. Anthuriums do not tolerate frost or freezing temperatures—which is why they work well indoors.

Pests: Anthuriums can fall victim to the same sort of pests that attack other indoor plants. Periodically wipe down the leaves with soapy water (both top and bottom) and you should be able to avoid the use of harsher chemical treatments.

Fertilizer: Give your anthurium nutrients by feeding it with a diluted high-phosphorus liquid fertilizer only about every other month. Fertilize only when the plant is actively growing.

Precautions: Anthuriums are poisonous to both pets and people when ingested. Some people are also sensitive to the leaves and may prefer to wear gloves to avoid skin irritation.

What to expect with anthurium

Anthuriums can grow up to 18″ tall. When healthy, this long-lasting plant blooms year-round and its flowers can last approximately eight weeks.

Photo by Stefano.